Instagram Round-Up: October

October 27, 2017
Instagram Round-Up: October

Welcome to October’s Instagram round-up. From 3D printed shoes to DIY crochet, this is what I’ve been double tapping throughout the month…

1.

When ballet flats came back around in the style-bereft wasteland that was the mid 2000s, I wore them as every other poor, unsuspecting victim of the era did; with 3/4 leggings and a cut off denim skirt. With memories of that indelibly etched on my brain, I carried a hatred of that particular shoe for years as I emerged, blinking and confused on the other side.ย 

However, in recent years, I’ve found myself drawn to them again. Not in an Ashlee Simpson tries to be edgy way, more of an Audrey Hepburn meets Leandra Medine way. So when a friend pointed me in the direction of Rothy’sย I could totally envisage their yellow pumps in my footwear repertoire. Even better than my reconciliation with a previously detested style, though, is that their shoes are crafted from 3D knitted, recycled plastic bottles.
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2.

I think I’m ready to become a smock person. I know, unequivocally, that I’ll be one when I have grey hair haphazardly tied up in a vintage scarf, so why not just start now, TBH? Nude Ethics, an online shop for ethical and sustainable designers, has been teasing me with beautifully shot images of t-shirts, dresses and shirts elevated with delicately illustrated fruit for weeks now. And I feel like the Pamela dress by Millie & Lou is the key to finally unlocking my ideal aesthetic: a perennially serene ceramics teacher who can reference obscure art at the drop of a hat without even a hint of smugness.ย 
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3.

Katie Jones is a knitwear designer and crochet pro who works with a focus on sustainability; addressing the onslaught of over-consumerism. While her work has always had a DIY slant – with the designer working on workshops and customisation alongside seasonal releases – she’s now taken the concept to it’s logical conclusion, releasing her 2018 as patterns that put the creative process back in the customer’s hands.

And here’s the bit I’m extra excited about: the DIY range will be complemented by a series of retreats, held throughout 2018. Each Great Make Escape will take place nestled in the Sussex countryside, with the location decorated with Katie’s vibrant, handmade creations. The whole thing sounds v. in line with my new smock wearing aesethtic.
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4.

A part of my brain had decided that Mochi weren’t an ethical brand, so I used to stare wistfully at their Instagram feed wondering why they couldn’t just become one so I could wear everything they make. Then, I took three seconds to actually look at their profile and, guess what, they are an ethical brand, which is probably why I followed them in the first place. (What can I say, I’m tired and I forgot…)

They’re dedicated to supporting local craftspeople, focusing on artisanal embroidery. Rather than just taking inspiration from cultures around the globe, they actively engage with them, enlisting the help and skills of people from the community to ensure each collection is authentic and gives back to the community that inspired it. Taking their meaningful creativity a step further, proceeds from their new Jaipur Collection will directly benefit Friends of Cancer Patients, in conjunction with Breast Cancer Awareness month.ย 

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